Teaching and Mentoring

I have tutored student-athletes, assisted with courses in introductory biology, graduate-level biostatistics, and comparative vertebrate morphology, advised student groups, and served as the lead instructor for high school and undergraduate ecology courses.  I have also had the opportunity to mentor over forty interns, including local high school students and teachers, undergraduates, and students from diverse backgrounds participating in university programs meant to broaden participation in the sciences.  I have found sharing my work with undergraduates is a mutually rewarding experience. I have extra hands, can be more productive, and end up being able to explain my work better; the students gain an introduction to experimental skills and are given a chance to see what research really entails. Several of the undergraduates I have worked with have developed senior honor projects with me. 

These experiences have taught me that teaching occurs in more than just the classroom; it also happens through mentoring students actively engaged in research, while collaborating with student groups, and through a multitude of other activities.  In all of these interactions, my goal is to guide students, as active learners, in becoming critical thinkers who can evaluate and assimilate material from across the spectrum of biology and connect it to other disciplines and their everyday life.  I believe that teaching is an integral part of both expanding the scientific community, and as a result I consistently work to better my teaching skills. These efforts have been recognized by my completion of the Certificate in College and University Teaching program and my selection for UCSB’s Fiona Goodchild Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Mentoring.  I have also served on Undergraduate Education Committees at Clemson University and UCSB, allowing me to contribute to the overall university goals and plans for undergraduate education.  

 
 The Conservation Biology Course (Spring 2015) works with HarborLab 
to collect seeds for a local restoration project.  Photo by Mitch Waxman.



Teaching and Mentoring Experience

Overview of teaching and mentoring interests and experience:  introductory biology (2008), conservation biology and sustainable development (2014 – 2016), ecology (2010, 2014 – 2016), marine biology, GIS, biostatistics (graduate level courses: 2011-2012, 2016; new undergraduate course developed for Baruch College, to be taught 2017), mathematical biology (new course developed for Baruch College, to be taught 2016-2017), urban ecology (new course developed for Baruch College, to be taught as special topics 2016 and class 2017-2018), wildlife ecology. Mentored over 40 undergraduate and graduate students.

Course Development

2016 Developed courses in Mathematical Biology, Biostatistics, and Urban Ecology for Baruch College curriculum

2015 Redesigned course in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development, Baruch College

Teaching Experience

2014-2016 Assistant Professor, Baruch College

Led courses in Fundamentals of Ecology (lecture (1 section) and laboratory (5 sections)), Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development (lecture and laboratory, 2 sections), and special topics courses focused on science communication (1 section), reintroductions (3 sections), diversity analysis (2 sections), and non-consumptive interactions (1 section)

2011-2012 Teaching Assistant, Biostatistics, UCSB graduate course

2011 Instructor, School for Scientific Thought Ecology Course, UCSB high school outreach course

2010 Instructor, Environmental Ecology, UCSB undergraduate course

2008 Teaching Assistant, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology Laboratory, UCSB undergraduate course

2007 Teaching Assistant, Comparative Vertebrate Morphology Lab, Clemson University undergraduate course

Mentoring Experience

2014-2016 Undergraduate and graduate student research mentor, Baruch College

Mentored seven students from multiple CUNY campuses, including work on two senior projects

Undergraduate students presented 2 posters at Baruch Creative Inquiry Day

2014 Three Seas Research Mentor for graduate student, Florida State University

2013-2014 Undergraduate Research Mentor, Florida State University

2008-2013 Undergraduate Research Mentor, UCSB, Supervised over thirty undergraduate students and three senior projects

2009-2012 Internships in Nanosystems Science, Engineering and Technology Mentor, UCSB summer research program for community college students

2009-2011 Research Mentorship Program Mentor, UCSB research program for high school students

2009-2010 Summer Institute for Mathematics and Science Mentor, UCSB research program for incoming freshmen

2009 Apprentice Researchers Program Mentor, UCSB summer research program for high school students

2007 Teaching Assistant, Comparative Vertebrate Morphology Lab, Clemson University undergraduate course

2006-2007 Biology and Mathematics Tutor, Vickery Hall Student-Athlete Enrichment Program, Clemson University

2005 Educational Program Assistant for Discover Life in America field trips for secondary students

Intern Presentations

Below are presentations from students I have worked with through various outreach programs. 
If available, clicking on the link will bring up a pdf of the work.

Amber Miller.  2012 Interships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern.  Relating Conservation Goals To Ecological Outcomes. Project webpage.

Lara Voelker.  2011 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern.  Optimal Foraging of Whelks in the Intertidal Zone.  Project Poster.

Lara Voelker.  2011 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern.  Optimal Foraging of Whelks in the Intertidal Zone.  Project Presentation.

Noah Bressman and Jake Weiner.  2010 Research Mentorship Program Interns.  Prey preferences of the lined shore crab. 

Angelica Trujillo.  2010 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern.  The Impacts of Temperature on Wentletraps and Anemones.  Project Poster.

Angelica Trujillo.  2010 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern.  The Impacts of Temperature on Wentletraps and Anemones.  Project Presentation.

Holly Avery, Sewwandi Madigopola, Johnny Molina, and Alan Sackrider.  2010 Summer Institute in Math and Science Interns.  Responses of California Limpets to Predation. 

Final project presentation.
Rosa Chavez and Alex Goodman. 2009 Research Mentorship Program Interns.

Jillian Davenport. 2009 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology Intern. The Role of Non-Consumptive Effects in Structuring West Coast Rocky Intertidal Communities. Project poster.


Jillian Davenport. 2009 Internships in Nanoscience, Science, and Technology  Intern. The Role of Non-Consumptive Effects in Structuring West Coast Rocky Intertidal Communities.  Final project presentation.

Bret Klopfenstein. Apprentice Researchers Program 2009 Intern. Importance of temperature to the non-consumptive effects of predators intertidal communities. Project website has video and presentation.

Amanda Baxter, Madison Cornwell, Taylor Scott, and Kimberly Ziles. 2009 Summer Institute in Math and Science Interns. Understanding How Environment Impacts Predators in Intertidal Communities. Final project presentation.